Egyptian princess

I have a beautiful Egyptian collar that I bought for roughly $25 in 2016.

I have never worn it, but I love it and REFUSE to donate it, even though all it does is take up space in my jewelry cabinet.

So I’m thinking the perfect thing to do is to build an outfit around it, maybe even a burner outfit.

I got inspired by THIS photo on Pinterest:

Turn the white dress into a white bathing suit and add a gold belt (preferably not beaded so that it doesn’t MOOP) and you’ve got a LEWK!

But it doesn’t stop there.

Oh no!

Because I also fell in love with this gold and turquoise Egyptian look:

I think it’d be fabulous to take a diaphanous white or gold fabric and make those arm bands with them.

For makeup, I’m loving the look on this model:

And there you have it, everything I need for my Egyptian princess look.

I have only one hesitation.

Is it culturally appropriate for a Nordic woman to wear an Egyptian style costume or will I catch hell for wearing it?

MOOP managed

The other day, while browsing Instagram, I came across a photo tagged with #BurningMan2018.

It was a photograph of a nearly naked Caucasian woman.

Covering her breasts were glitter and rhinestones.

She wore a tiny thong.

And on her head she wore a rainbow mohawk made of feathers.

Now.

I’m not a hater or an internet troll, but this picture bothered me.

It was an ideal representation of MOOP and cultural appropriation, two things I think Burning Man discourages.

Don’t get me wrong.

The woman was BEAUTIFUL.

And the picture was flawless.

But did it really represent Burning Man 2018?

No.

MOOP?

Yes.

MOOP is a HUGE problem at Burning Man and pictures like this promote the myth that things like glitter and questionably attached rhinestones are the norm at Burning Man.

Several people expressed their dislike of the photo in the comments section and I liked a comment that said, “This doesn’t represent Burning Man to me.”

The photographer responded with a “Hey, self-expression is encouraged at Burning Man.”

True.

But not when it creates MOOP.

Leave No Trace, buddy.

Anyway, I went back to Instagram to grab the photo for this post only to discover that it had been taken down.

Or perhaps the #BurningMan2018 hashtag had been removed.

MOOP managed.

 

 

MOOP managed

The other day, while browsing Instagram, I came across a photo tagged with #BurningMan2018.

It was a photograph of a nearly naked Caucasian woman.

Covering her breasts were glitter and rhinestones.

She wore a tiny thong.

And on her head she wore a rainbow mohawk made of feathers.

Now.

I’m not a hater or an internet troll, but this picture bothered me.

It was an ideal representation of MOOP and cultural appropriation, two things I think Burning Man discourages.

Don’t get me wrong.

The woman was BEAUTIFUL.

And the picture was flawless.

But did it really represent Burning Man 2018?

No.

MOOP?

Yes.

MOOP is a HUGE problem at Burning Man and pictures like this promote the myth that things like glitter and questionably attached rhinestones are the norm at Burning Man.

Several people expressed their dislike of the photo in the comments section and I liked a comment that said, “This doesn’t represent Burning Man to me.”

The photographer responded with a “Hey, self-expression is encouraged at Burning Man.”

True.

But not when it creates MOOP.

Leave No Trace, buddy.

Anyway, I went back to Instagram to grab the photo for this post only to discover that it had been taken down.

Or perhaps the #BurningMan2018 hashtag had been removed.

MOOP managed.